Sweet Remedy

Homemade Whipped Cream

Homemade Whipped Cream | Recipe from Sweet-Remedy.com

Making whipped cream at home truly couldn’t be easier. While it is just as easy to pick up a can of aerosol whipped cream or a tub of cool whip, you can really tell the difference with this homemade version.

Why Should You Make Homemade Whipped Cream?

Have you ever read the ingredients on a tub of cool whip? You would think it would just be some form of milk or other dairy product, right? Well, it’s not. The ingredients list is full of things like Hydrogenated Vegetable Oil and High Fructose Corn Syrup. These things aren’t the best for the human body. With that said, you should avoid them whenever possible. I don’t claim to have the best diet in the world, but I do avoid these things when I can.

The Low Down on Hydrogenated Vegetable Oil

Anything that is created to prolong the shelf-life or to make the cost of a product go down isn’t good in my book. It may be better for your wallet but in the long run, it’s worse for your health. I learned about partially hydrogenated vegetable oils in my nutrition class my first semester back to college. What I heard from my professor wasn’t cool. Basically the hydrogenation process transforms the oils that are actually good for us into something that the human body doesn’t digest or process well. (Source: The Center for Science in the Public Interest). The process of hydrogenation also creates Trans fat and it is believed that Trans fat raises the “bad” or LDL cholesterol in the bloodstream.

High Fructose Corn Syrup

The same goes for High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) in food production. It is cheaper than real cane sugar so that is the obvious reason it is used in its place.

HFCS is said to be a contributor to diabetes and obesity, among other health issues and concerns. It takes 3 times longer to digest.

Now, sugar itself isn’t that fantastic either and it can also contribute to diabetes and obesity but I try to eat it in moderation. This is obviously easier said than done! Am I right?

How do you avoid these things? By making your own whipped cream! (Also by becoming diligent when reading ingredient labels, sourcing better products and by cooking more often!)  You can use a batch of whipped cream in a variety of ways. I tend to dip fruit it in and use it as a topping on pancakes, French toast or desserts. I also used it in a family recipe for Creamy Chocolate Fondue Dip that called for cool whip and everything turned out just fine without all the processed junk.

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Homemade Whipped Cream

Homemade whipped cream is so easy to make, after you do it once you won't ever want to buy it again! It's perfect for dipping fruit or dolloping on desserts. The lemon juice will give the whipped cream a little zing and is completely optional.

Yield: 1 large batch

Prep Time: 05 min

Cook Time: 00 min

Total Time: 05 min

Ingredients:

2 cups heavy cream
2 Tbsp unrefined cane sugar
juice of 1/2 a lemon (optional)

Directions:

Pour the heavy cream into a medium sized bowl. Add the  sugar and with a hand mixer, whip the cream and sugar until light and fluffy. The cream on the beaters will start to form peaks when lifted out of the bowl.

Using a wooden citrus reamer, add the lemon juice and mix. Cover with a lid and store in the refrigerator until ready to use in a recipe or as a topping.

Used in this Recipe:

Related Recipes:

creamy-chocolate-fondue-dip

Creamy Chocolate Fondue Dip – Creamy and chocolate filled and perfect for dipping fruit or pound cake into. In this recipe I used the homemade whipped cream recipe found here in place of cool whip.

Disclosure: There are affiliate links in this post.

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9 Responses to “Homemade Whipped Cream”

  1. #
    1
    Jennifer — May 15, 2014 at 8:22 am

    I’ve never used lemon.. But cinnamon is always a good additive! I’ve also used vanilla and almond extract and nutmeg or cocoa powder for the holidays. Homemade whip cream is the only kind we use in our house! It’s quick and easy and requires few ingredients.

    • Samantha Seeley replied on — May 15th, 2014 at 12:30 pm

      The great thing about whipped cream is you can put whatever you want in it! Hooray creativity!

  2. #
    2
    Anne S — May 28, 2014 at 10:39 am

    I was like: What? Recipe for home made whipped cream? In Norway “everyone” are making whipped cream from scratch. Boxes with whipped cream exist, but they are only used exeptionally. The national cake in Norway is a multilayered sponge with whipped cream and berries (aka Bløtkake). You can not make that with cream from a Box.
    Anne S

    • Samantha Seeley replied on — May 30th, 2014 at 12:00 pm

      I wish that was the case here in the US! Whipped cream is most found in a can or a round tub. :(

  3. #
    3
    Gail — May 28, 2014 at 3:06 pm

    Doesn’t the lemon juice curdle the cream?

    Try using powedered sugar to make the cream stiffer.

    • Samantha Seeley replied on — May 30th, 2014 at 12:03 pm

      I haven’t had any issues with the lemon juice curdling the cream but I understand where you are coming from. I know a few others who make it like this. You can leave it out and it would be fine, or add vanilla.

      I originally made it with powdered sugar and I recently switched to unrefined granulated sugar so that is what I used here. I didn’t notice a difference between the two sugars myself but I’m sure that there is one. Thanks for your comment!

  4. #
    4
    Anne S — May 30, 2014 at 12:06 pm

    Well, anyway here is a recipe for Norwegian Bløtkake (in English). The blogger lives in Seattle. Perhaps whipped cream is more common there, where there are more people of Scandinavian heritage? http://www.outside-oslo.com/2013/06/14/celebrating-with-norwegian-blotkake/

    All families have their own variant of Bløtkake, because as you say, whipped cream can be combined with a large variety of marmelade, fruit, liquor, chocolate, you name it.

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